Wabi Sabi

I had to read this book for my Foundation in Media Design class, and although it wouldn't have been something that leaped off the shelf at me in a bookstore, I still really enjoyed it.

This is a very hard book to give a review on, since to concept of Wabi Sabi itself is very hard to grasp, (even by Japanese standards), the language itself is quite remarkable. I love books, especially little simple ones that give a broader understanding to world and the society we live in.

I was a student of Japanese culture, studying the language, traditions and history for many years. This book brought an even greater understanding to one of the simplest yet most intricate ceremonies in Japanese culture, that of the Tea Ceremony or Sado/ Chado. I have had Sado performed for me once, in high school. My parents and I were hosting a young woman from Japan, named Hiroko, for 3 weeks in our home. She dressed in a simple Kimono, minus Obi, and performed a ceremony that was over an hour long. I was about 14 at the time and the thing I remember most was that the tea was a brilliant green and the little cakes were excellent. I remember watching her perform the ritual, her movements were so delicate and flowing, she never missed a beat in her performance and all the while she was explaining the history of the ceremony and our role as the "guests" at her service. She proved a wonderful hostess and to this day my mother and I still recall the tea ceremony when we think or speak of Hiroko.

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